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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 1535367, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1535367
Research Article

Effect of High-Intensity Training in Normobaric Hypoxia on Thoroughbred Skeletal Muscle

1Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Yamaguchi University, Yoshida 1677-1, Yamaguchi 753-8515, Japan
2Equine Research Institute, Japan Racing Association, 1400-4 Shiba, Shimotsuke, Tochigi 329-0412, Japan

Received 22 March 2016; Revised 11 July 2016; Accepted 16 August 2016

Academic Editor: Jesús G. Ponce-González

Copyright © 2016 Hiroshi Nagahisa et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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