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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 2136902, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2136902
Research Article

Prophylactic Role of Oral Melatonin Administration on Neurogenesis in Adult Balb/C Mice during REM Sleep Deprivation

1Laboratorio de Microscopía de Alta Resolución, Departamento de Neurociencias, Centro Universitario de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad de Guadalajara, Calle Sierra Mojada 950, 44340 Guadalajara, JAL, Mexico
2Centro de Enseñanza Técnico Industrial (CETI) Campus Colomos, Ingeniería en Mecatrónica-Biomédica, Calle Nueva Escocia 1885, 44638 Guadalajara, JAL, Mexico
3Departamento de Farmacobiología, Centro Universitario de Ciencias Exactas e Ingenierías, Universidad de Guadalajara, Boulevard Marcelino García Barragán 1421, 44430 Guadalajara, JAL, Mexico
4Centro de Investigación Biomédica de Occidente, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS), Calle Sierra Mojada 800, 44340 Guadalajara, JAL, Mexico
5Instituto de Biotecnología, Centro de Investigación Biomédica, Parque Tecnológico de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad de Granada, Avenida del Conocimiento s/n, Armilla, 18100 Granada, Spain
6Laboratorio de Neurociencias, Facultad de Psicología, Universidad de Colima, Avenida Universidad 333, 28040 Colima, COL, Mexico

Received 6 April 2016; Revised 10 June 2016; Accepted 20 June 2016

Academic Editor: Przemko Tylzanowski

Copyright © 2016 Gabriela López-Armas et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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