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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 2586706, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2586706
Research Article

HSP27 Alleviates Cardiac Aging in Mice via a Mechanism Involving Antioxidation and Mitophagy Activation

1Department of Geriatrics, First Affiliated Hospital with Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, China
2Department of Anesthesiology, First Affiliated Hospital with Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, China
3Department of Surgery, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614, USA
4Department of Pathophysiology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, China

Received 30 September 2015; Revised 30 January 2016; Accepted 22 February 2016

Academic Editor: Alessandra Ricelli

Copyright © 2016 Shenglan Lin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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