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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016, Article ID 3975101, 25 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3975101
Review Article

Oxidative Stress Implications in the Affective Disorders: Main Biomarkers, Animal Models Relevance, Genetic Perspectives, and Antioxidant Approaches

1Department of Molecular and Experimental Biology, “Alexandru Ioan Cuza” University, 11 Carol I, 700506 Iaşi, Romania
2Romanian Academy, Iasi Branch, 8 Carol I, 700505 Iaşi, Romania
3“Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 16 Universitatii Street, 700115 Iasi, Romania

Received 20 April 2016; Revised 30 June 2016; Accepted 5 July 2016

Academic Editor: Felipe Dal Pizzol

Copyright © 2016 Ioana Miruna Balmus et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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