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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016, Article ID 6143753, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6143753
Research Article

Alternatively Spliced Methionine Synthase in SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cells: Cobalamin and GSH Dependence and Inhibitory Effects of Neurotoxic Metals and Thimerosal

1Department of Food Science and Nutrition, College of Agricultural and Marine Sciences, Sultan Qaboos University, 123 Al-Khoud, Oman
2Natural Sciences Department, Regis College, Weston, MA 02493, USA
3Department of Neurology, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA 02215, USA
4Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, MCPHS University, Manchester, NH 03101, USA
5Department of Medicine, New York University Medical School, New York, NY 10016, USA
6Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115, USA
7Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33328, USA

Received 6 September 2015; Revised 28 December 2015; Accepted 10 January 2016

Academic Editor: Antonio Ayala

Copyright © 2016 Mostafa Waly et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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