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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016, Article ID 6492469, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6492469
Research Article

The H2S Donor NaHS Changes the Expression Pattern of H2S-Producing Enzymes after Myocardial Infarction

1Shanghai Key Laboratory of Bioactive Small Molecules, Research Center on Aging and Medicine, Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China
2Center for Developmental Cardiology, Institute for Translational Medicine, College of Medicine, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266021, China
3Department of Physiology, Hebei Medical University, Hebei 050017, China
4Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Fudan University, Shanghai 201203, China

Received 8 September 2015; Revised 9 November 2015; Accepted 30 November 2015

Academic Editor: Massimo Collino

Copyright © 2016 Na Li et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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