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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016, Article ID 6714686, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6714686
Review Article

SIRT1: A Novel Target for the Treatment of Muscular Dystrophies

Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo 060-8556, Japan

Received 21 December 2015; Accepted 28 February 2016

Academic Editor: Pedro Gomes

Copyright © 2016 Atsushi Kuno and Yoshiyuki Horio. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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