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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 8379105, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8379105
Research Article

Açai (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) Upregulates Paraoxonase 1 Gene Expression and Activity with Concomitant Reduction of Hepatic Steatosis in High-Fat Diet-Fed Rats

1Research Center in Biological Sciences, Federal University of Ouro Preto, 35400-000 Ouro Preto, MG, Brazil
2Department of Biological Sciences, Federal University of Ouro Preto, 35400-000 Ouro Preto, MG, Brazil
3Federal University of São Paulo, 04039-002 São Paulo, SP, Brazil
4Postgraduate Program in Health and Nutrition, Federal University of Ouro Preto, 35400-000 Ouro Preto, MG, Brazil
5Department of Basic Health, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Governador Valadares Campus, 35010-177 Governador Valadares, MG, Brazil
6Department of Foods, Federal University of Ouro Preto, 35400-000 Ouro Preto, MG, Brazil

Received 25 March 2016; Revised 15 June 2016; Accepted 11 July 2016

Academic Editor: Borna Relja

Copyright © 2016 Renata Rebeca Pereira et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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