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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 8413032, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8413032
Review Article

The Tumorigenic Roles of the Cellular REDOX Regulatory Systems

Centre for Biomedical Research (CBMR), University of Algarve, Campus of Gambelas, Building 8, Room 2.22, 8055-139 Faro, Portugal

Received 7 June 2015; Accepted 10 August 2015

Academic Editor: Thomas Kietzmann

Copyright © 2016 Stéphanie Anaís Castaldo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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