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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016, Article ID 9012580, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9012580
Review Article

HCV and Oxidative Stress: Implications for HCV Life Cycle and HCV-Associated Pathogenesis

1Department of Virology, Paul-Ehrlich-Institut, Paul-Ehrlich-Straße 51–59, 63225 Langen, Germany
2Deutsches Zentrum für Infektionsforschung (DZIF), Gießen-Marburg-Langen, 63225 Langen, Germany

Received 25 November 2015; Accepted 14 January 2016

Academic Editor: Alexander V. Ivanov

Copyright © 2016 Regina Medvedev et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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