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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016, Article ID 9057593, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9057593
Review Article

Mitochondria in the Aging Muscles of Flies and Mice: New Perspectives for Old Characters

1Centro de Estudios Moleculares de la Célula, ICBM, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Chile, 8389100 Santiago, Chile
2Centro de Genómica y Bioinformática, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Mayor, 8580000 Santiago, Chile

Received 29 January 2016; Revised 30 March 2016; Accepted 16 May 2016

Academic Editor: Felipe Dal Pizzol

Copyright © 2016 Andrea del Campo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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