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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016, Article ID 9348651, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9348651
Review Article

RAGE Expression and ROS Generation in Neurons: Differentiation versus Damage

1Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Genoa, Via L.B. Alberti 2, 16132 Genoa, Italy
2Giannina Gaslini Institute, Via Gerolamo Gaslini 5, 16147 Genoa, Italy

Received 26 February 2016; Accepted 3 May 2016

Academic Editor: Kota V. Ramana

Copyright © 2016 S. Piras et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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