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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017, Article ID 1420892, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1420892
Research Article

Effects of Novel Nitric Oxide-Releasing Molecules against Oxidative Stress on Retinal Pigmented Epithelial Cells

1Department of Drug Sciences, University of Catania, Catania, Italy
2Department of Biomedical and Biotechnological Sciences, Section of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, University of Catania, Catania, Italy
3Inserm U955, Equipe 12, 94000 Créteil, France
4Université Paris Est, Faculté de Médecine, 94000 Créteil, France
5Center for Research in Ocular Pharmacology – CERFO, University of Catania, Catania, Italy

Correspondence should be addressed to Claudio Bucolo; ti.tcinu@olocub.oidualc

Received 29 June 2017; Accepted 27 August 2017; Published 12 October 2017

Academic Editor: Adrian Smedowski

Copyright © 2017 Valeria Pittalà et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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