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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017, Article ID 1721434, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1721434
Research Article

Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Attenuates Septic Myocardial Dysfunction via eNOS/NO Pathway in Rats

1Department of Anesthesiology, The Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410011, China
2Department of Anesthesiology, Third Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510630, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Feng Xiao; moc.kooltuo@hcuotnisruoy

Received 9 February 2017; Accepted 6 April 2017; Published 9 July 2017

Academic Editor: Dake Qi

Copyright © 2017 Ni Zeng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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