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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017, Article ID 1976191, 16 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1976191
Research Article

Comparative Therapeutic Effects of Minocycline Treatment and Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cell Transplantation following Striatal Stroke

Laboratory of Experimental Neuroprotection and Neuroregeneration, Institute of Biological Sciences, Federal University of Pará, Belém, PA, Brazil

Correspondence should be addressed to Walace Gomes-Leal; moc.liamg@laelsemogw

Received 20 November 2016; Revised 27 February 2017; Accepted 13 March 2017; Published 21 June 2017

Academic Editor: Ryuichi Morishita

Copyright © 2017 Celice C. Souza et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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