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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017, Article ID 2138169, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/2138169
Research Article

The Treadmill Exercise Protects against Dopaminergic Neuron Loss and Brain Oxidative Stress in Parkinsonian Rats

1Faculty of Medicine of the Federal University of Ceará (UFC), Fortaleza, CE, Brazil
2Faculty of Medicine Estácio of Juazeiro do Norte (Estácio/FMJ), Juazeiro do Norte, CE, Brazil

Correspondence should be addressed to Glauce Socorro de Barros Viana; moc.evil@anaivbg

Received 7 February 2017; Revised 23 April 2017; Accepted 26 April 2017; Published 21 June 2017

Academic Editor: Rodrigo Franco

Copyright © 2017 Roberta Oliveira da Costa et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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