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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 3647657, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3647657
Review Article

Fe-S Clusters Emerging as Targets of Therapeutic Drugs

1CNRS UMR 3348, Centre Universitaire, 91405 Orsay, France
2Institut Curie, PSL Research University, UMR 3348, 91405 Orsay, France
3Université Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, Centre Universitaire, UMR 3348, 91405 Orsay, France

Correspondence should be addressed to Laurence Vernis; rf.eiruc@sinrev.ecnerual

Received 27 September 2017; Revised 27 November 2017; Accepted 6 December 2017; Published 28 December 2017

Academic Editor: Serafina Perrone

Copyright © 2017 Laurence Vernis et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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