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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017, Article ID 3720128, 16 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3720128
Review Article

MicroRNAs and Autophagy: Fine Players in the Control of Chondrocyte Homeostatic Activities in Osteoarthritis

1Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche e Neuromotorie, Università di Bologna, Bologna, Italy
2Dipartimento di Scienze Mediche e Chirurgiche, Università di Bologna, Bologna, Italy
3Laboratorio di Immunoreumatologia e Rigenerazione Tissutale, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna, Italy

Correspondence should be addressed to Silvia Cetrullo; ti.obinu@ollurtec.aivlis

Received 24 February 2017; Revised 12 May 2017; Accepted 22 May 2017; Published 21 June 2017

Academic Editor: Kotb Abdelmohsen

Copyright © 2017 Stefania D’Adamo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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