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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017, Article ID 3839756, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3839756
Research Article

Sulforaphane Protects against High Cholesterol-Induced Mitochondrial Bioenergetics Impairments, Inflammation, and Oxidative Stress and Preserves Pancreatic β-Cells Function

1Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, P.O. Box 8380453, Santiago, Chile
2School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072, Australia
3Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology, University of Chile, P.O. Box 138-11, Santiago, Chile

Correspondence should be addressed to Catalina Carrasco-Pozo; lc.elihcu.dem@ocsarracanilatac

Received 22 November 2016; Revised 17 January 2017; Accepted 22 January 2017; Published 12 March 2017

Academic Editor: Giuseppe Cirillo

Copyright © 2017 Catalina Carrasco-Pozo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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