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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017, Article ID 3920195, 16 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3920195
Review Article

A Review of the Molecular Mechanisms Underlying the Development and Progression of Cardiac Remodeling

1Department of Medical Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, “La Sapienza” University of Rome, Latina, Italy
2Department of AngioCardioNeurology, IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli, Italy
3Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA
4Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Salerno, 84081 Baronissi, Italy
5IRCCS, Bambino Gesù, Rome, Italy

Correspondence should be addressed to Giacomo Frati; ti.dniwni@ollecitarf

Received 30 March 2017; Accepted 30 May 2017; Published 2 July 2017

Academic Editor: Stefano Toldo

Copyright © 2017 Leonardo Schirone et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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