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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 4082102, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4082102
Research Article

Sirt1 Protects Endothelial Cells against LPS-Induced Barrier Dysfunction

1Department of Critical Care Medicine, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515, China
2Guangdong Key Lab of Shock and Microcirculation Research, Department of Pathophysiology, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Qiaobing Huang; nc.ude.ums@gnib and Zhongqing Chen; moc.361@8002nehcgniqgnohz

Received 22 May 2017; Revised 16 August 2017; Accepted 12 September 2017; Published 25 October 2017

Academic Editor: Andreas Daiber

Copyright © 2017 Weijin Zhang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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