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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 5093473, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5093473
Research Article

Blockage of NOX2/MAPK/NF-κB Pathway Protects Photoreceptors against Glucose Deprivation-Induced Cell Death

Department of Ophthalmology, Second Hospital of JiLin University, Changchun 130041, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Guang-Yu Li; moc.nuyila@uygnaugil

Received 23 April 2017; Revised 8 July 2017; Accepted 18 July 2017; Published 11 September 2017

Academic Editor: Kota V. Ramana

Copyright © 2017 Bin Fan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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