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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017, Article ID 7020295, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7020295
Review Article

Are Antioxidants a Potential Therapy for FSHD? A Review of the Literature

Department of Physiology, School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand

Correspondence should be addressed to Adam Philip Denny; zn.ca.ogato.dargtsop@ynned.mada

Received 22 February 2017; Revised 27 April 2017; Accepted 3 May 2017; Published 12 June 2017

Academic Editor: Janusz Gebicki

Copyright © 2017 Adam Philip Denny and Alison Kay Heather. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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