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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 7028478, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7028478
Research Article

Heme Oxygenase-1, a Key Enzyme for the Cytoprotective Actions of Halophenols by Upregulating Nrf2 Expression via Activating Erk1/2 and PI3K/Akt in EA.hy926 Cells

1School of Pharmaceutical Science, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001, China
2Shanxi University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Taiyuan 030024, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Qing Shan Li; moc.361@2102sqlxs

Received 24 November 2016; Revised 23 February 2017; Accepted 12 April 2017; Published 14 June 2017

Academic Editor: Shane Thomas

Copyright © 2017 Xiu E. Feng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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