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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 7905486, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7905486
Review Article

P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) and Oxidative Stress: Focus on Alzheimer’s Disease

1Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, Alma Mater Studiorum-University of Bologna, Via Irnerio 48, 40126 Bologna, Italy
2Department for Life Quality Studies, Alma Mater Studiorum-University of Bologna, Corso d’Augusto, 237, 47900 Rimini, Italy

Correspondence should be addressed to Patrizia Hrelia; ti.obinu@ailerh.aizirtap

Received 2 August 2017; Accepted 30 October 2017; Published 26 November 2017

Academic Editor: Sandra Donnini

Copyright © 2017 Giulia Sita et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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