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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 8018197, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8018197
Review Article

Linking Cancer Cachexia-Induced Anabolic Resistance to Skeletal Muscle Oxidative Metabolism

1Department of Exercise Science, University of South Carolina, Rm. 405 Public Health Research Center, 921 Assembly Street, Columbia, SC 29208, USA
2Center for Colon Cancer Research, University of South Carolina, Rm. 614 Jones PSC Bldg, 712 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to James A. Carson; ude.cs.xobliam@jnosrac

Received 22 September 2017; Accepted 6 November 2017; Published 11 December 2017

Academic Editor: Giuseppe Filomeni

Copyright © 2017 Justin P. Hardee et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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