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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 8398072, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8398072
Research Article

The Effects of Blast Exposure on Protein Deimination in the Brain

1Neuroscience Program, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD, USA
2Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Genetics, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Gregory P. Mueller; ude.shusu@relleum.yrogerg

Received 19 January 2017; Accepted 16 March 2017; Published 24 May 2017

Academic Editor: Francisco J. Romero

Copyright © 2017 Peter J. Attilio et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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