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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 8539026, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8539026
Research Article

Activation of p47phox as a Mechanism of Bupivacaine-Induced Burst Production of Reactive Oxygen Species and Neural Toxicity

Department of Anesthesiology, Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510282, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Le Li; moc.621@11elil and Shi-yuan Xu; moc.361@553uxnauyihs

Received 7 February 2017; Accepted 4 April 2017; Published 8 June 2017

Academic Editor: Yanfang Chen

Copyright © 2017 Yu-jie Li et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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