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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017, Article ID 8541064, 16 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8541064
Research Article

Progression of Hepatic Adenoma to Carcinoma in Ogg1 Mutant Mice Induced by Phenobarbital

Department of Molecular Pathology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Abeno-Ku, Asahi-Machi 1-4-3, Osaka 545-8585, Japan

Correspondence should be addressed to Anna Kakehashi; pj.ca.uc-akaso.dem@anna

Received 22 March 2017; Revised 19 May 2017; Accepted 14 June 2017; Published 13 July 2017

Academic Editor: Laura Giusti

Copyright © 2017 Anna Kakehashi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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