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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017, Article ID 9067875, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9067875
Research Article

Exercise Training under Exposure to Low Levels of Fine Particulate Matter: Effects on Heart Oxidative Stress and Extra-to-Intracellular HSP70 Ratio

1Department of Life Sciences, Research Group in Physiology, Regional University of Northwestern Rio Grande do Sul State (UNIJUÍ), Ijuí, RS, Brazil
2Postgraduate Program in Integral Attention to Health (PPGAIS-UNIJUÍ/UNICRUZ), Ijuí, RS, Brazil
3Laboratory of Oxidative Stress and Air Pollution, Postgraduate Program in Health Sciences, Federal University of Health Sciences of Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil

Correspondence should be addressed to Thiago Gomes Heck; rb.ude.iujinu@kceh.ogaiht

Received 26 July 2017; Accepted 19 October 2017; Published 13 December 2017

Academic Editor: Geraint D. Florida-James

Copyright © 2017 Aline Sfalcin Mai et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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