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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 9080869, 16 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9080869
Review Article

Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Diabetic Atherosclerosis: Herbal Medicines as a Potential Therapeutic Approach

1Department of Cardiology, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100029, China
2Graduate School, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing 100029, China
3Cardiovascular Disease Centre, Xiyuan Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing 100091, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Yue Liu; moc.liamtoh@traeheuyuil and Shuzheng Lyu; nc.moc.liamdem@gnehzuhs

Received 26 April 2017; Revised 30 June 2017; Accepted 10 July 2017; Published 13 August 2017

Academic Editor: Mariateresa Giuliano

Copyright © 2017 Jinfan Tian et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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