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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017, Article ID 9824192, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9824192
Research Article

Impact of Hot Environment on Fluid and Electrolyte Imbalance, Renal Damage, Hemolysis, and Immune Activation Postmarathon

1Institute of Physical Activity and Sports Sciences, University of Cruzeiro do Sul, São Paulo, SP, Brazil
2School of Physical Education and Sport, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil
3Sports Cardiology Department, Dante Pazzanese Institute of Cardiology, São Paulo, SP, Brazil

Correspondence should be addressed to Maria Fernanda Cury-Boaventura; rb.ude.lusodoriezurc@arutnevaob.airam

Received 2 June 2017; Revised 9 August 2017; Accepted 26 October 2017; Published 21 December 2017

Academic Editor: Andrey J. Serra

Copyright © 2017 Rodrigo Assunção Oliveira et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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