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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2018 (2018), Article ID 2021645, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/2021645
Research Article

Heme Oxygenase-2 Localizes to Mitochondria and Regulates Hypoxic Responses in Hepatocytes

1Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA
2Department of Cell Biology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA
3Center for Biologic Imaging, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA
4Department of Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA
5VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, Pittsburgh, PA, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Brian S. Zuckerbraun; ude.cmpu@sbnuarbrekcuz

Received 20 November 2017; Revised 15 February 2018; Accepted 6 March 2018; Published 12 April 2018

Academic Editor: Antonio Ayala

Copyright © 2018 Paul K. Waltz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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