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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2018, Article ID 2450748, 19 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/2450748
Review Article

The Role of Free Radicals in Autophagy Regulation: Implications for Ageing

1Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas “Alberto Sols” UAM-CSIC, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria La Paz (IdiPaz) and Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Autonomous University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain
2Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), ISCIII, Madrid, Spain
3Centre for Molecular Medicine Norway (NCMM), Nordic EMBL Partnership for Molecular Medicine, University of Oslo, 0318 Oslo, Norway
4Centre for Experimental Medicine, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Videnska 1958 Prague, Czech Republic

Correspondence should be addressed to M. Cahova; zc.meki@avohac.akinom

Received 21 September 2017; Revised 5 January 2018; Accepted 16 January 2018; Published 26 February 2018

Academic Editor: Silvana Hrelia

Copyright © 2018 M. Pajares et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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