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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2018, Article ID 3804979, 17 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/3804979
Review Article

Free Radical Damage in Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury: An Obstacle in Acute Ischemic Stroke after Revascularization Therapy

1Department of Neurology, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Chang Chun 130021, China
2Clinical Trail and Research Center for Stroke, Department of Neurology, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Chang Chun 130021, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Yi Yang; moc.361@iygnayrotcod

Received 5 September 2017; Accepted 7 December 2017; Published 31 January 2018

Academic Editor: Daniela Giustarini

Copyright © 2018 Ming-Shuo Sun et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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