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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2018, Article ID 3812568, 16 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/3812568
Research Article

Hydrogen Sulfide Abrogates Hemoglobin-Lipid Interaction in Atherosclerotic Lesion

1HAS-UD Vascular Biology and Myocardial Pathophysiology Research Group, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Debrecen 4012, Hungary
2Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Debrecen, Debrecen 4012, Hungary
3Department of Molecular Immunology and Toxicology, National Institute of Oncology, Budapest 1122, Hungary
4Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Debrecen, Debrecen 4012, Hungary
5Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Debrecen, Debrecen 4012, Hungary
6Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, University of Debrecen, Debrecen 4032, Hungary
7University of Exeter Medical School, Exeter, UK
8College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK
9Division of Vascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Debrecen, Debrecen 4012, Hungary

Correspondence should be addressed to József Balla; moc.akinilkleb@allab

Received 2 August 2017; Revised 6 November 2017; Accepted 14 November 2017; Published 21 January 2018

Academic Editor: Kota V. Ramana

Copyright © 2018 László Potor et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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