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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2018, Article ID 4652480, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/4652480
Research Article

Aerobic Training Prevents Heatstrokes in Calsequestrin-1 Knockout Mice by Reducing Oxidative Stress

1Center for Research on Ageing and Translational Medicine (CeSI-MeT), University G. d’Annunzio, 66100 Chieti, Italy
2Department of Neuroscience, Imaging, and Clinical Sciences (DNICS), University G. d’Annunzio, 66100 Chieti, Italy
3Department of General Pathology, Londrina State University, 86057-970 Londrina, PR, Brazil
4Department of Medicine and Aging Science (DMSI), University G. d’Annunzio, 66100 Chieti, Italy

Correspondence should be addressed to Flávia Alessandra Guarnier; rb.moc.oohay@reinraugaf

Received 24 November 2017; Revised 1 February 2018; Accepted 21 February 2018; Published 3 April 2018

Academic Editor: Yong Zhang

Copyright © 2018 Flávia Alessandra Guarnier et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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