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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2018, Article ID 4805493, 19 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/4805493
Research Article

Diaphragm Muscle Weakness Following Acute Sustained Hypoxic Stress in the Mouse Is Prevented by Pretreatment with N-Acetyl Cysteine

1Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland
2Department of Physiology, Trinity Biomedical Sciences Institute, Trinity College Dublin, The University of Dublin, Dublin, Ireland

Correspondence should be addressed to Ken D. O’Halloran; ei.ccu@narollaho.k

Received 2 June 2017; Revised 29 October 2017; Accepted 12 December 2017; Published 19 February 2018

Academic Editor: Andrey J. Serra

Copyright © 2018 Andrew J. O’Leary et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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