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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2018 (2018), Article ID 6435861, 16 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/6435861
Review Article

Oxidant/Antioxidant Imbalance in Alzheimer’s Disease: Therapeutic and Diagnostic Prospects

Laboratory of Preclinical Testing of Higher Standard, Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology, Polish Academy of Science, Pasteur 3 St., 02-093 Warsaw, Poland

Correspondence should be addressed to Urszula Wojda; lp.vog.ikcnen@adjow.u

Received 14 September 2017; Accepted 18 December 2017; Published 31 January 2018

Academic Editor: Christopher Horst Lillig

Copyright © 2018 Joanna Wojsiat et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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