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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2018, Article ID 8596903, 6 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/8596903
Review Article

Role and Possible Mechanisms of Sirt1 in Depression

1National Key Disciplines, Key Laboratory for Cellular Physiology of Ministry of Education, Department of Neurobiology, Shanxi Medical University, No. 56 Xin Jian South Road, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030001, China
2Department of Environmental Health, Shanxi Medical University, No. 56 Xin Jian South Road, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030001, China
3Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, UNT System College of Pharmacy, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Xiaorong Yang; moc.361@225225_gnor

Received 13 September 2017; Revised 18 November 2017; Accepted 4 December 2017; Published 31 January 2018

Academic Editor: Reiko Matsui

Copyright © 2018 Guofang Lu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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