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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2019, Article ID 7210892, 16 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/7210892
Review Article

Mitochondrial Dysfunctions: A Thread Sewing Together Alzheimer’s Disease, Diabetes, and Obesity

1Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Padua, 35131 Padua, Italy
2National Research Council, Department of Biomedical Science, Neuroscience Institute (Padua Section), 35131 Padua, Italy

Correspondence should be addressed to Emy Basso; ti.rnc@ossab.yme

Received 25 January 2019; Revised 20 April 2019; Accepted 21 May 2019; Published 16 June 2019

Guest Editor: Ulrike Hendgen-Cotta

Copyright © 2019 Giulia Rigotto and Emy Basso. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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