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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2019, Article ID 9042526, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/9042526
Research Article

Worsening of Oxidative Stress, DNA Damage, and Atherosclerotic Lesions in Aged LDLr-/- Mice after Consumption of Guarana Soft Drinks

1Pharmaceutical Sciences Graduate Program, Vila Velha University (UVV), Vila Velha, ES, Brazil
2Federal Institute of Education, Science, and Technology (IFES), Vila Velha, ES, Brazil
3Laboratory of Cellular Ultrastructure Carlos Alberto Redins (LUCCAR), Department of Morphology, Health Sciences Center, Federal University of Espirito Santo (UFES), Vitoria, ES, Brazil
4Laboratory of Translational Physiology, Health Sciences Center, Federal University of Espirito Santo, Vitoria, ES, Brazil
5Pharmacology of Chronic Diseases (CDPHARMA), Molecular Medicine and Chronic Diseases Research Center (CIMUS), University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain

Correspondence should be addressed to Thiago Melo Costa Pereira; moc.liamg@cmtarierep

Received 8 February 2019; Accepted 12 May 2019; Published 10 June 2019

Academic Editor: Silvana Hrelia

Copyright © 2019 Layla Aparecida Chisté et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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