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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2019, Article ID 9165214, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/9165214
Review Article

Mitochondrial Entry of Cytotoxic Proteases: A New Insight into the Granzyme B Cell Death Pathway

Department of Biomedical Science, University of Padova and Veneto Institute of Molecular Medicine, Via G. Orus 2, 35129 Padova, Italy

Correspondence should be addressed to Denis Martinvalet; ti.dpinu@telavnitram.sined

Received 2 February 2019; Accepted 8 April 2019; Published 21 May 2019

Guest Editor: Livia Hool

Copyright © 2019 Denis Martinvalet. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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