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Occupational Therapy International
Volume 2017, Article ID 5190901, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5190901
Research Article

Developing and Sustaining Recovery-Orientation in Mental Health Practice: Experiences of Occupational Therapists

The University of Sydney, Cumberland Campus, 74 East St., Lidcombe, NSW 2141, Australia

Correspondence should be addressed to Nicola Hancock; ua.ude.yendys@kcocnah.alocin

Received 30 July 2016; Accepted 24 January 2017; Published 26 February 2017

Academic Editor: Claudia Hilton

Copyright © 2017 Alexandra Nugent et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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