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Occupational Therapy International
Volume 2018, Article ID 3439815, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/3439815
Research Article

Deep, Surface, or Both? A Study of Occupational Therapy Students’ Learning Concepts

1Department of Occupational Therapy, Prosthetics and Orthotics, Faculty of Health Sciences, OsloMet-Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo, Norway
2Faculty of Health Studies, VID Specialized University, Sandnes, Norway

Correspondence should be addressed to Tore Bonsaksen; on.aoih@neskasnob.erot

Received 5 March 2018; Accepted 6 June 2018; Published 7 August 2018

Academic Editor: Jodie A. Copley

Copyright © 2018 Tore Bonsaksen. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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