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Prostate Cancer
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 895238, 22 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/895238
Review Article

Mouse Models of Prostate Cancer

Van Andel Research Institute, 333 Bostwick Avenue N.E., Grand Rapids, MI 49503, USA

Received 10 August 2010; Revised 12 November 2010; Accepted 4 January 2011

Academic Editor: Craig Robson

Copyright © 2011 Kenneth C. Valkenburg and Bart O. Williams. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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