Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Prostate Cancer
Volume 2015, Article ID 728046, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/728046
Research Article

Thioredoxin 1 in Prostate Tissue Is Associated with Gleason Score, Erythrocyte Antioxidant Enzyme Activity, and Dietary Antioxidants

1Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269, USA
2Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY 14263, USA
3Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
4School of Public Health, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA
5School of Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
6Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Cancer Prevention and Control Program, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA
7David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
8Department of Statistics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269, USA

Received 16 April 2015; Accepted 29 July 2015

Academic Editor: Craig Robson

Copyright © 2015 Terrence M. Vance et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. R. Siegel, J. Ma, Z. Zou, and A. Jemal, “Cancer statistics, 2014,” CA Cancer Journal for Clinicians, vol. 64, no. 1, pp. 9–29, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. O. W. Brawley, “Prostate cancer epidemiology in the United States,” World Journal of Urology, vol. 30, no. 2, pp. 195–200, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. A. R. Patel and E. A. Klein, “Risk factors for prostate cancer,” Nature Clinical Practice Urology, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 87–95, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. A. Paschos, R. Pandya, W. C. M. Duivenvoorden, and J. H. Pinthus, “Oxidative stress in prostate cancer: changing research concepts towards a novel paradigm for prevention and therapeutics,” Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases, vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 217–225, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. J. E. Klaunig, L. M. Kamendulis, and B. A. Hocevar, “Oxidative stress and oxidative damage in carcinogenesis,” Toxicologic Pathology, vol. 38, no. 1, pp. 96–109, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. H. Li, P. W. Kantoff, E. Giovannucci et al., “Manganese superoxide dismutase polymorphism, prediagnostic antioxidant status, and risk of clinical significant prostate cancer,” Cancer Research, vol. 65, no. 6, pp. 2498–2504, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. M. Goodman, R. M. Bostick, K. C. Ward et al., “Lycopene intake and prostate cancer risk: effect modification by plasma antioxidants and the XRCC1 genotype,” Nutrition and Cancer, vol. 55, no. 1, pp. 13–20, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. Z. Arsova-Sarafinovska, A. Eken, N. Matevska et al., “Increased oxidative/nitrosative stress and decreased antioxidant enzyme activities in prostate cancer,” Clinical Biochemistry, vol. 42, no. 12, pp. 1228–1235, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. M. Brys, A. Morel, E. Forma et al., “Relationship of urinary isoprostanes to prostate cancer occurence,” Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, vol. 372, no. 1-2, pp. 149–153, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. D. A. Barocas, S. Motley, M. S. Cookson et al., “Oxidative stress measured by urine F2-isoprostane level is associated with prostate cancer,” Journal of Urology, vol. 185, no. 6, pp. 2102–2107, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. B. Kumar, S. Koul, L. Khandrika, R. B. Meacham, and H. K. Koul, “Oxidative stress is inherent in prostate cancer cells and is required for aggressive phenotype,” Cancer Research, vol. 68, no. 6, pp. 1777–1785, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. R. A. Cairns, I. S. Harris, and T. W. Mak, “Regulation of cancer cell metabolism,” Nature Reviews Cancer, vol. 11, no. 2, pp. 85–95, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. R. Singal, J. van Wert, and M. Bashambu, “Cytosine methylation represses glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) gene expression in human prostate cancer cells,” Cancer Research, vol. 61, no. 12, pp. 4820–4826, 2001. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. E. S. J. Arnér and A. Holmgren, “The thioredoxin system in cancer,” Seminars in Cancer Biology, vol. 16, no. 6, pp. 420–426, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. S. S. Singh, Y. Li, O. H. Ford III et al., “Thioredoxin reductase 1 expression and castration-recurrent growth of prostate cancer,” Translational Oncology, vol. 1, no. 3, pp. 153–157, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. W. Shan, W. Zhong, R. Zhao, and T. D. Oberley, “Thioredoxin 1 as a subcellular biomarker of redox imbalance in human prostate cancer progression,” Free Radical Biology & Medicine, vol. 49, no. 12, pp. 2078–2087, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. A. Holmgren and J. Lu, “Thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase: current research with special reference to human disease,” Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, vol. 396, no. 1, pp. 120–124, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. E. S. J. Arnér, “Focus on mammalian thioredoxin reductases—important selenoproteins with versatile functions,” Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, vol. 1790, no. 6, pp. 495–526, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. T. M. Vance, J. Su, E. T. H. Fontham, S. I. Koo, and O. K. Chun, “Dietary antioxidants and prostate cancer: a review,” Nutrition and Cancer, vol. 65, no. 6, pp. 793–801, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. H. Sharma, R. Kanwal, N. Bhaskaran, and S. Gupta, “Plant flavone apigenin binds to nucleic acid bases and reduces oxidative DNA damage in prostate epithelial cells,” PLoS ONE, vol. 9, no. 3, Article ID e91588, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. K. Gao, S. M. Henning, Y. Niu et al., “The citrus flavonoid naringenin stimulates DNA repair in prostate cancer cells,” Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, vol. 17, no. 2, pp. 89–95, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. M. Serafini and D. Del Rio, “Understanding the association between dietary antioxidants, redox status and disease: is the Total Antioxidant Capacity the right tool?” Redox Report, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 145–152, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. K. M. Russnes, K. M. Wilson, M. M. Epstein et al., “Total antioxidant intake in relation to prostate cancer incidence in the health professionals follow-up study,” International Journal of Cancer, vol. 134, no. 5, pp. 1156–1165, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. J. C. Schroeder, J. T. Bensen, L. J. Su et al., “The North Carolina-Louisiana Prostate Cancer Project (PCaP): methods and design of a multidisciplinary population-based cohort study of racial differences in prostate cancer outcomes,” Prostate, vol. 66, no. 11, pp. 1162–1176, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. National Institutes of Health ARP and National Cancer Institute, Diet History Questionnaire, Version 1.0, 2007.
  26. A. Floegel, D.-O. Kim, S.-J. Chung et al., “Development and validation of an algorithm to establish a total antioxidant capacity database of the US diet,” International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition, vol. 61, no. 6, pp. 600–623, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus