Parkinson’s Disease
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CiteScore3.600
Impact Factor1.758
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A Study for Expanding Application Sites for Rotigotine Transdermal Patch

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Parkinson’s Disease publishes research related to the epidemiology, etiology, pathogenesis, genetics, cellular, molecular and neurophysiology, as well as the diagnosis and treatment of Parkinson’s disease.

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Research Article

Prediction of Life Satisfaction in People with Parkinson’s Disease

Introduction. People with Parkinson’s disease (PD) have lower life satisfaction (LS) than healthy peers. No study has yet identified predictors of LS in people with PD. Such information would be valuable for health care and future interventions that aim to maintain or increase LS. Aim. To examine how LS evolved in people with PD over a 3-year period, as well as to identify predictive factors of LS. Methods. We used data from baseline assessments and a 3-year follow-up of 163 people with PD (baseline, mean age 68 years; median PD duration 8 years, 35% women). LS was assessed with item 1 of the Life Satisfaction Questionnaire (LiSat-11). Dichotomized LS data from the 3-year follow-up were used as the dependent variable in multivariable logistic regression analyses. In the first step, independent variables included baseline information on sex, education, general self-efficacy, motor symptoms, perceived walking difficulties, fall-related activity avoidance, and difficulties with/need help in activities of daily living. At the second step, depressive symptoms were added as an independent variable. Results. The proportion of those who reported being satisfied with their lives reduced from 63.2% at baseline to 49.7% 3 years later (). When depressive symptoms were not included in the analysis, general self-efficacy (odds ratio, OR = 1.081; 95% CI = 1.019–1.147) and perceived walking difficulties (OR = 0.962; 95% CI = 0.929–0.997) were significant () predictors of LS 3 years later. With depressive symptoms included, the influence of walking difficulties diminished, and depressive symptoms (OR = 0.730; 95% CI = 0.607–0.877) and general self-efficacy (OR = 1.074; 95% CI = 1.010–1.142) were the only significant predictors of LS 3 years later. Conclusions. LS is reduced over a 3-year period. The study suggests that perceived walking difficulties, general self-efficacy, and depressive symptoms are important predictors of LS in people with PD.

Research Article

Analysis of Motor Complication and Relative Factors in a Cohort of Chinese Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

Objective. Motor complications are common in Parkinson’s disease (PD). The reported occurrence of motor complications varies across regions and races. The aim of our study was to describe the development of dyskinesias and motor fluctuations among Chinese PD patients and the relative risk factors. Methods. In the current cross-sectional survey study, PD patients with motor fluctuations and dyskinesia were enrolled from March to November 2018 in Shaanxi province, a northwest area of China. Data were collected by the movement disorder specialists. A self-designed questionnaire was utilized during face-to-face interviews. In addition, the relevant factors of motor complications were analyzed by univariable and multivariable analyses. Results. Of the166 PD patients recruited, 52 (31.33%) and 25 (15.06%) patients had motor fluctuations and dyskinesia, respectively, which occurred in 6.76 ± 3.77 and 8.61 ± 4.46 years after the onset of motor symptoms and 5.37 ± 3.33 and 6.80 ± 3.43 years after the treatment of levodopa therapy, respectively. Patients with motor fluctuations and dyskinesias had longer disease duration, younger onset age, higher Hoehn–Yahr stages and UPDRS III scores, higher daily levodopa dosage and levodopa equivalent daily dose (LEDD), and longer duration of levodopa treatment (). Bradykinesia-rigidity dominant patients had higher incidences of motor fluctuations (61.54% vs 38.46%) and dyskinesias (68.00% vs 32.00%) than tremor-dominant patients (). Results of the multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that the duration of levodopa therapy, age of the onset, and bradykinesia-rigidity dominant type were independent risk factors of motor fluctuations (). In addition, duration of disease and bradykinesia-rigidity dominant type were independent risk factors of dyskinesia (). Conclusions. The rate of motor fluctuations was higher than dyskinesias in Chinese patients with Parkinson’s disease. Patients with younger age onset, bradykinesia-rigidity dominant type, longer disease duration, and longer duration of levodopa therapy are more likely to develop motor complications.

Research Article

“Does the Response to Morning Medication Predict the ADL-Level of the Day in Parkinson’s Disease?”

Background. Individuals with Parkinson’s Disease (PD) have bradykinesia during mobility tasks in the morning before intake of dopaminergic treatment and have difficulties managing Activities of Daily Living (ADLs). Early morning off (EMO) refers to off-states in the morning where the severity of bradykinesia is increased and causes a decrease in mobility related to wearing off of effects of medication. Measurements from devices capable of continuously recording motor symptoms may provide insight into the patient’s response to medication and possible impact on ADLs. Objectives. To test whether poor or slow response to medication in the morning predicts the overall ADL-level and to assess the association between change in bradykinesia score (BKS) and the risk of having disabilities within three selected ADL-items. Methods. In this cross-sectional study, the sample consists of 34 patients with light to moderate PD. Data collection encompasses measurements from the Parkinson KinetiGraph, and the ADL-limitations are assessed by the Movement Disorder Society Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS) Part II. Results. The association between UPDRS- II and BKS from the algorithm was −0.082 (), 95% CL:−0.113; −0.042). The individuals experienced disabilities in performing “Speech” () and “Doing hobbies” () when being slow or poor responders to dopaminergic therapy. The PD patients’ L-dopa equivalent dose seems to be a strong predictor of the ADL-level in the morning. Conclusion. Slow response to the medication dosages in the morning is correlated with disabilities in the overall ADL-level in PD. The combination of PD-drugs and precise, timely dosages must be considered in the improvement of the ADL-level in PD patients.

Research Article

Skin Temperature in Parkinson’s Disease Measured by Infrared Thermography

Background. Patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) often show peripheral autonomic dysfunction and depositions of pathological alpha-synuclein aggregates in the skin. However, functional consequences of this skin involvement have received little attention. Objective. To determine thermographic differences in the skin between healthy controls (HCs) and PD patients on hands, feet, and trunk and to correlate findings with symptoms and signs of dysautonomia. Between-group differences in autonomic parameters and questionnaires were explored. Methods. Twenty-one PD patients and 19 HCs were examined by thermographic infrared imaging of standardized anatomical locations on the trunk and upper and lower extremities at baseline and after exposure to cold stress test (CST). Thermal recovery rates (RRs) were determined on the basis of thermograms. Correlation analyses between alterations in skin temperature and autonomic dysfunction were performed. Results. The most significant RR difference between PD patients and HCs was seen on the fifth distal phalanx 10 minutes post-CST (mean RR ± SD: 51 ± 18% vs. 70 ± 23%,  = 0.003). No between-group differences were seen in baseline or post-CST values of the feet. No correlations were seen between thermal parameters and clinical and autonomic data. In the HC group, a positive, moderate correlation was seen between post-CST recovery values on the 3rd and 5th phalanx and body mass index (BMI) (r = 0.661,  = 0.002). Conclusions. The PD patients exhibited significant reduction in RR compared to HC and patients also displayed altered thermal responses in multiple anatomical locations. Thus, infrared thermography could become an important future tool in investigation of autonomic deficiency in PD.

Research Article

Saturdays-in-Motion: Education and Empowerment through an Interdisciplinary Team Approach for Parkinson’s Disease in Cali-Colombia

Introduction. Parkinson’s disease (PD) is one of the most prevalent age-related neurodegenerative disorders. The progression of PD produces an important disease burden in patients due to functional impairment, which also has repercussions on caregivers. In addition, it has become a challenge for health systems, especially in developing countries, which have limited resources. Multidisciplinary teams with a community approach have proved effective in high-income countries; however, there is no reported literature in low- and middle-income countries about this kind of initiative. Objective. This paper aims to document the experience of patients, caregivers, and experts in a community approach as an innovative model in a middle-income country. Methods. A quantitative descriptive research was conducted. The selection criteria were having a PD diagnosis, attending with a caregiver to Saturdays in Motion (SIM), or being a clinical expert invited to SIM. PD patients and their caregivers answered three surveys on their points of view with respect to SIM: SIM and their quality of life (QoL) and PDQ-39 and Zarit, whereas clinical experts completed two questions related to the SIM program. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the results of the surveys and clinical tests. Results. Forty-eight, twenty-four, and twenty-one subjects answered surveys one, two, and three, respectively. In total, four clinical experts were interviewed. 87.9% of the patients consider that SIM activities improved their QoL. The most affected areas in PDQ-39 were those related to the social area. Around 66.6% of the caregivers reported a mild burden on Zarit and think that SIM enhances the PD patient’s QoL. Clinical experts highlighted the sense of community and empathy. Conclusion. Our preliminary experience shows a multidisciplinary model with a community approach which redefines the traditional relationship between patients, caregivers, and clinical experts. This aim of this initiative is that education and empowerment patients and caregivers reach a better perception of QoL.

Research Article

Association of Tooth Loss with New-Onset Parkinson’s Disease: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study

Introduction. Tooth loss is associated with poor oral hygiene. During insufficient oral sanitation, focal infection and inflammation can occur and these reactions may induce systemic inflammation. Systemic inflammatory reaction may be related to the degeneration of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra. We hypothesized that tooth loss is related to increased risk of new-onset Parkinson’s disease. Methods. Between 2003 and 2006, we included 153,165 participants from the national health insurance system-health screening cohort in Korea. The incidence of new-onset Parkinson’s disease was defined as International Classification of Diseases-10 code “G20,” accompanying the prescription records for any anti-Parkinson’s disease medication. Results. Approximately 19.9% of the included participants had periodontal disease. After a median duration of 10.4 years, 1,227 (0.8%) cases of new-onset Parkinson’s disease were noted. The number of tooth loss was positively related to an increased risk of new-onset Parkinson’s disease. Contrastingly, the frequency of tooth brushings and dental clinic visits for any causes as well as competent dental care were negatively related to the development of new-onset Parkinson’s disease. In multivariable analysis, the number of tooth loss (≥15) was positively related to new-onset Parkinson’s disease development (hazard ratio: 1.38, 95% confidence interval (1.03–1.85), , for trend = 0.043) after adjusting variables. Conclusion. Our study demonstrated that the number of tooth loss was positively correlated with a higher risk of new-onset Parkinson’s disease development in a longitudinal study setting. Increased number of tooth loss may be an important risk indicator of new-onset Parkinson’s disease.

Parkinson’s Disease
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate51%
Submission to final decision78 days
Acceptance to publication35 days
CiteScore3.600
Impact Factor1.758
 Submit

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