Parkinson’s Disease
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Acceptance rate42%
Submission to final decision101 days
Acceptance to publication46 days
CiteScore2.270
Impact Factor2.051
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Association of Motor and Cognitive Symptoms with Health-Related Quality of Life and Caregiver Burden in a German Cohort of Advanced Parkinson’s Disease Patients

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Parkinson’s Disease publishes research related to the epidemiology, etiology, pathogenesis, genetics, cellular, molecular and neurophysiology, as well as the diagnosis and treatment of Parkinson’s disease.

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Research Article

Validation of a Parkinson Disease Predictive Model in a Population-Based Study

Parkinson disease (PD) has a relatively long prodromal period that may permit early identification to reduce diagnostic testing for other conditions when patients are simply presenting with early PD symptoms, as well as to reduce morbidity from fall-related trauma. Earlier identification also could prove critical to the development of neuroprotective therapies. We previously developed a PD predictive model using demographic and Medicare claims data in a population-based case-control study. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) indicated good performance. We sought to further validate this PD predictive model. In a randomly selected, population-based cohort of 115,492 Medicare beneficiaries aged 66–90 and without PD in 2009, we applied the predictive model to claims data from the prior five years to estimate the probability of future PD diagnosis. During five years of follow-up, we used 2010–2014 Medicare data to determine PD and vital status and then Cox regression to investigate whether PD probability at baseline was associated with time to PD diagnosis. Within a nested case-control sample, we calculated the AUC, sensitivity, and specificity. A total of 2,326 beneficiaries developed PD. Probability of PD was associated with time to PD diagnosis (, hazard ratio = 13.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 10.6–17.3 for the highest vs. lowest decile of probability). The AUC was 83.3% (95% CI 82.5%–84.1%). At the cut point that balanced sensitivity and specificity, sensitivity was 76.7% and specificity was 76.2%. In an independent sample of additional Medicare beneficiaries, we again applied the model and observed good performance (AUC = 82.2%, 95% CI 81.1%–83.3%). Administrative claims data can facilitate PD identification within Medicare and Medicare-aged samples.

Research Article

Attitude of Asian Parkinson Patients towards Clinical Research and Tissue Donation

Objective. The success of clinical research and tissue donation programs are highly dependent on recruitment of willing volunteers. A comprehensive survey of patient preferences and attitudes can help identify and address barriers hindering the recruitment for research. Method. This is a cross-sectional study on 105 Parkinson’s disease patients who completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Results. Out of 105 respondents, 48% of patients had either already participated in clinical research or were keen to participate. About 80% believed clinical research to be safe for their health and privacy. More than 70% of participants were willing to donate blood, urine, or stool, while 16% were agreeable for cerebrospinal fluid sample donation. Motivating factors for clinical research included altruism (64%) and contribution to advance medical knowledge (64%). Common reasons for unwillingness towards clinical research included the risks involved (43%), time constraints (33%), and mobility challenges (24%). Conclusion. The attitude of Singaporean Parkinson patients toward clinical research and tissue donation is encouraging with about half of the participants willing to support clinical research. Three-quarters of patients would support tissue donations. Participation in research may be further increased with greater patient and public education to overcome misconceptions and also by limiting the demands of studies.

Research Article

LRRK2 Mutations and Asian Disease-Associated Variants in the First Parkinson’s Disease Cohort from Kazakhstan

Background. LRRK2 mutations have emerged as the most prevalent and potentially treatable determinants of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Peculiar geographic distribution of these mutations has triggered an interest in genotyping PD cohorts of different ethnic backgrounds for LRRK. Objective. Here, we report on the results of LRRK2 screening in the first Central Asian PD cohort. Methods. 246 PD patients were consecutively recruited by movement disorder specialists from four medical centers in Kazakhstan, and clinicodemographic data and genomic DNA from blood were systematically obtained and shipped to the Institute of Neurology University College London together with DNAs from 200 healthy controls. The cohort was genotyped for five LRRK2 mutations (p.Gly2019Ser, p.Arg1441His, p.Tyr1699Cys, p.Ile2020Thr, and p.Asn1437His) and three East Asian disease-associated variants (p.Gly2385Arg, p.Ala419Val, and p.Arg1628Pro) via Kompetitive allele-specific polymerase chain reaction assay analysis. Results. None of the study subjects carried LRRK2 mutations, whereas the following Asian variants were found with insignificant odds ratios (OR): p.Gly2385Arg (1.2%, minor allele frequency (MAF) 0.007, OR 1.25, ), p.Ala419Val (3.7%, MAF 0.02, OR 1.5, ), and p.Arg1628Pro was found only in 1% of controls. p.Gly2385Arg was positive in a big family with PD and tremor, although with incomplete segregation. One early-onset PD subject was homozygous for p.Ala419Val who developed fast progression and severe dyskinesias. p.Ala419Val was associated with early-onset PD. Conclusions. We showed that East Asian LRRK variants could be found in Central Asian populations but their pathogenicity remains to be elucidated in larger PD cohorts.

Research Article

Validation of Revised Chinese Version of PD-CRS in Parkinson’s Disease Patients

There is a high prevalence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia in Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients, but a Chinese version of cognitive rating scale that is specific and sensitive to PD patients is still lacking. The aims of this study are to test the reliability and validity of a Chinese version of Parkinson’s disease-cognitive rating scale (PD-CRS), establish cutoff scores for diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease dementia (PDD) and PD with mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI), explore cognitive profiles of PD-MCI and PDD, and find cognitive deficits suggesting a transition from PD-MCI to PDD. PD-CRS was revised based on the culture background of Chinese people. Ninety-two PD patients were recruited in three PD centers and were classified into PD with normal cognitive function (PD-NC), PD-MCI, and PDD subgroups according to the cognitive rating scale (CDR). Those PD patients underwent PD-CRS blind assessment by a separate neurologist. The PD-CRS showed a high internal consistency (Cronbach’s Alpha = 0.840). Intraclass Correlation coefficient (ICC) of test-retest reliability reached 0.906 (95% CI 0.860–0.935, ). ICC of inter-rater reliability was 0.899 (95% CI 0.848–0.933, ). PD-CRS had fair concurrent validity with MDRS (ICC = 0.731, 95% CI 0.602–0.816). All the frontal-subcortical items showed significant decrease in PD-MCI compared with the PD-NC group (), but the instrument cortical items did not (confrontation naming , copying a clock ). All the frontal-subcortical and instrumental-cortical functions showed significant decline in PDD compared with the PD-NC group (). The cutoff value for diagnosis of PD-MCI is 80.5 with the sensitivity of 75.7% and the specificity of 75.0%, and for diagnosis of PDD is 73.5 with the sensitivity of 89.2% and the specificity of 98.9%. Revised Chinese version of PD-CRS is a reliable, acceptable, valid, and useful neuropsychological battery for assessing cognition in PD patients.

Research Article

Improvement of Blood Plasmalogens and Clinical Symptoms in Parkinson’s Disease by Oral Administration of Ether Phospholipids: A Preliminary Report

Introduction. Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer’s disease (AD). With the ageing of population, the frequency of PD is expected to increase dramatically in the coming decades. L-DOPA (1,3,4-dihydroxyalanine) is the most effective drug in the symptomatic treatment of PD. Nonmotor symptoms in PD include sleep problems, depression, and dementia, which are not adequately controlled with dopaminergic therapy. Here, we report the efficacy of oral administration of scallop-derived ether phospholipids to some nonmotor symptoms of PD. Methods. Ten (10) patients received oral administration of 1 mg/day of purified ether phospholipids derived from scallop for 24 weeks. Clinical symptoms and blood tests were checked at 0, 4, 12, 24, and 28 weeks. The blood levels of plasmalogens in patients with PD were compared with those of 39 age-matched normal controls. Results. Initial levels of plasma ethanolamine ether phospholipids in PD and ethanolamine plasmalogen of erythrocyte from PD were lower than those of age-matched normal controls. Oral administration of 1 mg/day of the purified ether phospholipids increased plasma ether phospholipids in PD and increased the relative composition of ether phospholipids of erythrocyte membrane in PD. The levels of ether phospholipids in peripheral blood reached to almost normal levels after 24 weeks. Furthermore, some clinical symptoms of PD improved concomitantly. Conclusion. 1 mg/day of oral administration of purified ether phospholipids derived from scallop can increase ether phospholipids in peripheral blood and concomitantly improve some clinical symptoms of PD.

Research Article

Atomoxetine Does Not Improve Complex Attention in Idiopathic Parkinson’s Disease Patients with Cognitive Deficits: A Meta-Analysis

Objectives. To evaluate the effects of atomoxetine on complex attention and other neurocognitive domains in idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (PD). Methods. Interventional trials reporting changes in complex attention and other neurocognitive functions (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-5) following administration of atomoxetine for at least 8 weeks in adults with idiopathic PD were included. Effect sizes (Cohen’s d), the standardized mean difference in the scores of each cognitive domain, were compared using a random-effects model (MetaXL version 5.3). Results. Three studies were included in the final analysis. For a change in complex attention in PD with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), the estimated effect size was small and nonsignificant (0.16 (95% CI: −0.09, 0.42), n = 42). For changes in executive function, perceptual-motor function, language, social cognition, and learning and memory, the estimated effect sizes were small and medium, but nonsignificant. A deteriorative trend in executive function was observed after atomoxetine treatment in PD with MCI. For a change in global cognitive function in PD without MCI, the estimated effect size was large and significant. Conclusion. In idiopathic PD with MCI, atomoxetine does not improve complex attention. Also, a deteriorative trend in the executive function was noted.

Parkinson’s Disease
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate42%
Submission to final decision101 days
Acceptance to publication46 days
CiteScore2.270
Impact Factor2.051
 Submit