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Parkinson’s Disease
Volume 2011, Article ID 979231, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/979231
Review Article

Genetic Mutations and Mitochondrial Toxins Shed New Light on the Pathogenesis of Parkinson's Disease

Department of Neurology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8421, Japan

Received 11 April 2011; Revised 2 June 2011; Accepted 12 June 2011

Academic Editor: Honglei Chen

Copyright © 2011 Shigeto Sato and Nobutaka Hattori. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

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