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Parkinson’s Disease
Volume 2012, Article ID 174079, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/174079
Clinical Study

Metacognitive Performance, the Tip-of-Tongue Experience, Is Not Disrupted in Parkinsonian Patients

1Department of Psychology, Central Michigan University, Health Professions Building, Room 2181, 1280 E. Campus Drive, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859, USA
2Department of Psychiatry & Psychology, Behavioral Health Services, Lutheran Hospital, 1730 W. 25th Street, Cleveland, OH 44113, USA
3Department of Psychology, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859, USA
4Department of Psychology, DePaul University, Chicago, IL 60614, USA
5Department of Psychology, Central Michigan University, 101 Sloan Hall, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859, USA

Received 22 March 2011; Revised 12 December 2011; Accepted 12 January 2012

Academic Editor: Gregory P. Crucian

Copyright © 2012 Justin D. Oh-Lee et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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